Happy Teen Read Week 2011!

October 16-22 is Teen Read Week, a time to celebrate all things teen lit related at your library! The Teen’s Top Ten has been announced — over 9,000 teens voted nationwide and the winners are:

https://i2.wp.com/syndetics.com/index.aspx1. Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare

https://i2.wp.com/syndetics.com/index.aspx 2. Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins

https://i2.wp.com/syndetics.com/index.aspx 3. Crescendo by Becca Fitzpatrick

https://i2.wp.com/syndetics.com/index.aspx 4. I Am Number Four by Pittacus Lore

https://i2.wp.com/syndetics.com/index.aspx 5. Iron King by Julie Kagawa

https://i2.wp.com/syndetics.com/index.aspx 6. Matched by Ally Condie

https://i2.wp.com/syndetics.com/index.aspx 7. Angel: A Maximum Ride Novel by James Patterson

https://i2.wp.com/syndetics.com/index.aspx 8. Paranormalcy by Kiersten White

https://i2.wp.com/syndetics.com/index.aspx 9. Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver

https://i2.wp.com/syndetics.com/index.aspx 10. Nightshade by Andrea Cremer

Come check out some of these excellent titles if you haven’t had a chance yet!

And all teens should be sure to join us this Friday, October 21 for a Manga and Make Candy Sushi Party at the library from 2:30-4:00.

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Book Review: Crossed by Ally Condie

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(Sequel to Matched. This title will be released on November 1, 2011)

Reeling from the abrupt loss of her Aberration love, Ky, Cassia heads into the treacherous Outer Providences to find him. They seem to always be minutes apart until they finally reunite — only to be torn apart by Cassia’s determination to join the Rebellion and Ky’s misgivings. Ky also has to worry about losing Cassia to Xander because Xander has a secret that could make Cassia his forever.

A powerful novel that makes you wonder about your own capacity for love and hate, this is another moving story about love, death, and the reaches of human cruelty. Ally Condie has a talent for weaving many distinct threads into one startling whole.  I loved the alternating chapters. They gave me an insight into the different ways Cassia and Ky viewed the various situations that arise. Both characters had very strong voices, and the supporting characters like Indie, Eli, Vick, and Hunter are all well-developed and distinct — much more so than in the first book. The cliffhanger ending is clearly meant to support another — I can’t wait!

-Reviewed by Marissa, age 14

Book Review: The Centaur’s Daughter by Ellen Abbott

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(Sequel to Watersmeet)

Still coming to terms with the loss of her father and her newfound home, Absina is shocked when the seemingly perfect community of Watersmeet becomes as divided and hateful as the village she once fled. Now, Absinia must reunite the lands of Uran and Watersmeet, all while adjusting to some startling changes and feelings she is undergoing.

I liked that Absina’s character is as relateable as always, It is easy to connect with her and the situation seems like it happens right outside the door. There was nothing I didn’t like about this book. The cover design features an image of Absina’s face and it immediately made me connect it with Watersmeet. The hooves are a nice, subtle touch of foreshadowing. This is an absolutely stunning companion to Watersmeet. No bookshelf is complete without it.

I admire the way Ellen Abbott is able to weave powerful lessons on prejudice into her works. The lessons never come across as “preachy,” but sink in gradually. As Absina accepts who she is and her role in everybody’s future, it is hard to think back upon the first few chapters of Watersmeet and remember how much she hated and feared dwarves, centaurs, and the rest of the ill-named “beasts.” I was not expecting a sequel and was therefore excited to find The Centaur’s Daughter. I always wondered what happened after the battle with the white worm, how Absina dealt with the death of her father and if she became Keeper. This book answered those questions but left me with more, as well as a sense of eagerness — with the cliffhanger ending, I know there must be another book on the way!

– Reviewed by Marissa, age 14

 

Blood: Book One in the Mercian Trilogy by K.J. Wignall

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A boy named William is turned into a vampire at the age of 16, when the year was 1256. I like that this book was always keeping you at the edge of your seat. I didn’t like that I couldn’t read the second book right away! I’d recommend this book to fantasy lovers of the ages of 13 and up. I rate it 5 stars — I loved it!

-Reviewed by Vanessa L., age 13